Jon Andrus

ROTA Council Member, United States

Executive Vice President & Director of Vaccine Advocacy and Education, Sabin Vaccine Institute

Jon Andrus joined the Sabin Vaccine Institute in October 2014 where he serves as executive vice president and director of the Vaccine Advocacy and Education program.

Previously, Dr. Andrus served as deputy director at the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), where he oversaw departments of Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Relief; Knowledge Management and Communication; External Relations, Partnerships, and Governing Bodies; Planning, Budget and Resource Coordination; and the work of the Ethics Office and Ombudsman. Prior to that, he was the lead technical advisor for PAHO’s immunization program, providing oversight and guidance for PAHO’s technical cooperation to member countries.

Dr. Andrus holds faculty appointments at the University of California, San Francisco and the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. He began his global health career as a Peace Corps volunteer, serving as a district medical officer in Malawi and has since held positions in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Global Immunization Division, as head of the Vaccinology and Immunization Program at the Institute for Global Health at the Universities of California at San Francisco and Berkeley, and as director and professor of the Global Health MPH Program at GWU.

Dr. Andrus has published more than 100 scientific peer-reviewed papers on topics covering disease eradication, the introduction of new vaccines and primary care. He has received numerous awards, including the 2013 Transformational Leadership Award of the University of California, the 2011 Global Leadership Award of the Pneumococcal Awareness Committee of Experts, and the 2000 Distinguished Service Medal—the highest award of the United States Public Health Service—for his leadership in working to eradicate polio in Southeast Asia. He has also received awards for his leadership in the eradication of measles, rubella and congenital rubella syndrome, as well as the introduction of new vaccines in developing countries.

Dr. Andrus holds a Bachelor of Science from Stanford University, obtained a medical degree from the University of California, Davis and completed his residencies in family medicine at the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, and preventive medicine at the CDC.